Meet Eve, MISC's summer intern!

Hi there! My name is Eve, and I’m MISC’s 2016 summer intern. My job includes helping out with MISC’s social media and newsletters, as well as programs including the up-and-coming community radio station, KXRW, the Non-Profit Hour, a monthly podcast which focuses on non-profits doing great work in and around the Portland community, and the Summer Documentary Program! I was lucky enough to visit the “Camp” portion of the summer program in beautiful Gearheart, Oregon and get to meet the twelve media makers who are in the program. I was impressed (and a little intimidated)  they’re all talented and passionate about media making change.

 

Group picture at camp - I'm front row left!!  

Group picture at camp - I'm front row left!!

 

A little about me: I’m from New York City and grew up watching old musicals with my mom and grandmother like The Sound of Music and The Wizard of Oz. I always loved movies, especially anything colorful, loud, and a little weird, like SLC Punk, The Doom Generation, Jawbreaker, Heathers, and The Fifth Element. But I didn’t start making my own videos until high school, when I filmed a group of my friends dancing to Deceptacon by Le Tigre, one of my favorite bands. 

 

After that, I shot the music video for my friends’ band, Claire’s Diary, about a group of schoolgirls who secretly worship boy bands, which was later featured on Rookie Magazine.

 

I moved to Portland in 2013 to study at Reed College. I love the city; currently I live in a small house dubbed the “Troll Hole” with three of my friends, a bunny rabbit, and an impressive collection of VHS tapes. I’ll be a senior in Anthropology this year, and I’m planning on writing my thesis on 3-D printing and what it means for the future of art, museum policy, and cultural repatriation. When I’m not in school, I like to read Philip Roth books, play guitar, and find cool places outside the city: one of my favorites is Enchanted Forest, a theme park/ art installation nestled in the woods half an hour outside of Portland, which was built by hand by Roger Tofte in the 70s- I highly recommend visiting!

Since my time at Reed, I’ve realized just how powerful media, especially film, can be. I first saw what is now one of my favorite documentaries, Paris Is Burning by Jenny Livingston, in an introductory anthropology class. The documentary captured the lives of gay and trans performers on the New York ball circuit in the 90s, creating an intimate and deeply moving portrait of a group of misunderstood and underepresented individuals. I’m always amazed by how films can transport and immerse you in a completely different world, and make you care about issues you might not have known about before.

Paris Is Burning

Paris Is Burning

Some of my other favorite pieces of media making change include Very Young Girls by Nina Alvarez, about sex trafficking in New York City, and

 

Very Young Girls

Very Young Girls

and The Great Happiness Space, by Jake Klennel, which documents the lives of Japanese host clubs, the men who work there, and the women who frequent them.

 

The Great Happiness Space  

The Great Happiness Space

 

I’m excited to work for the Media Institute for Social Change because of its mission to highlight the power of storytelling and give individuals who are doing amazing things through nonprofit work an opportunity tell their stories. I can’t wait to see what the students create over the course of the summer, and I’m super excited to meet and work with all the talented individuals who are part of MISC.

Signing off,

Eve